in Letter Writing

Several months ago, I got it in my brain to use some of the photo’s I’ve taken and turn them into photo cards that I can mail people. I’ve learned quite a few things since I started making these cards, and I’ve now created well over two hundred of them. Here’s some of what I’ve learned.

The most important part are the photos themselves. I’ve used three different services for getting photo prints: Walmart, Target, and Snapfish (online only). Walmart was the worse. Their photos have a weird texture, and it really drove me crazy. Target was good, but their machines are finicky. I really prefer Snapfish.

When you’re uploading files to snapfish, I made the mistake the first time of not editing them ahead of time. So when they were printed, they were cropped poorly in order to fit the 6×4 size. For the next batch, I took each photo into Paint.net and cropped them exactly to 6×4, and that worked so much better. The photos arrive after about a week, and they’re very high quality prints. THey are perfect for this use.

The next most important part is the card stock. I bought this from my local Office Max: Neenah Creative Collection 11×17. This is enough card stock to make 100 cards @ 2 per sheet. Cut the card stock so that you have two 6 1/4 in by 8 1/4 in pieces. You’ll have some scraps. I recommend using a paper cutter for this. I don’t have the kindergarten skill required to use scissors very well.

The best glue I’ve found for this is Scotch Wrinkle-free Glue.n In the beginning I was making sure to cover every part of the back side of the photo before gluing it onto the card stock. I’ve discovered this isn’t really necessary, and creates too much of a mess. Just get some glue on the back of the photo and it will be great.

Here’s the whole process:

  1. Cut your card stock. I tend to cut a large pile of them, so you can get an assembly line going.
  2. Fold each piece. Some people use a bone thingy for this, but I like using a very smooth rock I found on a beach here in Oregon
  3. Glue the photo on. Align against the fold. The card stock is larger than the paper, and you’ll be cutting the excess off later.
  4. Apply pressure and let it set. I usually put a stack of cards underneath some books or other heavy object and leave them overnight
  5. Trim the edges. Once again, I prefer a paper cutter for this, but you might be better with scissors than me

And that’s all!

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